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Table of Contents
SHORT COMMUNICATION
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 47-48

Making a case for the usefulness of the traditional curriculum in indian settings


1 Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission15-Apr-2019
Date of Decision04-May-2020
Date of Acceptance27-May-2020
Date of Web Publication30-Jun-2020

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth (SBV) – Deemed to be University, Tiruporur - Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpaet District - 603108, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/JIHS.JIHS_16_19

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  Abstract 


In the field of delivery of medical education in India, the adoption of Competency Based Medical Education (CBME) has been regarded as one of the most important landmarks in the timeline of the profession. Even though, we have shifted altogether to CBME, it is not right to consider that there were no positive attributes which were linked with traditional curriculum. We have to accept that CBME is a resource-intensive program in comparison to the traditional curriculum and thus in order to ensure its successful implementation, we have to adopt the better components of traditional curriculum and improve the assessment process as a whole. In conclusion, the traditional curriculum in medical education has played a very crucial role in the making of a wide range of specialists and doctors for prolonged durations. Although, some important attributes of a medical professional were not given much attention, we have to accept the fact that it was very much required for the successful launch and implementation of Competency-Based Medical Education in the nation.

Keywords: Traditional curriculum, Medical education, Competency-Based Medical Education


How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Making a case for the usefulness of the traditional curriculum in indian settings. J Integr Health Sci 2020;8:47-8

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Making a case for the usefulness of the traditional curriculum in indian settings. J Integr Health Sci [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Jul 15];8:47-8. Available from: http://www.jihs.in/text.asp?2020/8/1/47/288684




  Introduction Top


In the field of delivery of medical education in India, the adoption of Competency Based Medical Education (CBME) has been regarded as one of the most important landmarks in the timeline of the profession.[1] These educational reforms have been brought about after a very long time, but even now, it cannot be implemented across the nations in the desired manner without the active engagement of all the concerned parties.[1] The approach to introduce CBME for the delivery of medical education is extremely essential to produce a competent medical graduate and at the same time it has provisions to overcome the multiple shortcomings of traditional curriculum.[1],[2]

Positive attributes of traditional curriculum

Even though, we have shifted altogether to CBME, it is not right to consider that there were no positive attributes which were linked with traditional curriculum.[3]

Our teachers

All the teachers in the medical profession till date have gained their names and made remarkable progress after being taught through traditional curriculum only and thus we have to look for the positive elements of the same.[3] We accept that in traditional curriculum, we adopted Forward model, wherein the outcomes were not explicitly defined at the time of the start of the course, our teachers were very much competent and we gained all of our skills based on their experience and expertise.[2],[3]

Teaching-learning methods

Similarly, in traditional curriculum, the process of teaching-learning had multiple subjective concerns, but then, the presence of components like bedside teaching and role modeling, our teachers were skilled and were able to reach final diagnosis without subjecting the patients to unnecessary laboratory tests.[3],[4]

Emphasis on knowledge domain

In traditional curriculum, emphasis was given to the knowledge domain predominantly, but the domains of attitude and communication were broadly not given much attention. However, it is important to accept that even though that practice was not good, especially in the current circumstances of medical practice, we have to accept that even for a better attitude and communication domain, a good support of knowledge is a must. In other words, the knowledge component has played an important role in the making of a competent physician.[3],[4]

Teachers - The driving force

In CBME, the students' have been made responsible for their own learning, while in traditional curriculum the onus was on teachers. Even though, it might not sound as a process that encourages active learning, teachers are the ones who are well accustomed with the recent developments and understand the demands for the future medico. In the process of delivery of the curriculum, the teachers can take the right call to ensure passage of right information to the students at the most appropriate time, which would have been difficult to manage by the students alone.[3],[4]

CBME in real sense??

It is important to understand that in general, despite the adoption of CBME, we have not adopted the same in essence. This is so, because the duration of the course is not variable which is supposed to be the case in CBME. In other words, right from the time of implementation of the course, we have adopted a hybrid model, wherein we don't want to further expand the overall duration of the course and make the course even more stressful.

Resource-intensive program

We have to accept that CBME is a resource-intensive program in comparison to the traditional curriculum and thus in order to ensure its successful implementation, we have to adopt the better components of traditional curriculum and improve the assessment process as a whole.[1],[5] In-fact, realizing the diversified needs and the infrastructure / resources required for the successful implementation of CBME and with a solitary aim to benefit the learners, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, a Constituent Unit of Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth, Puducherry has taken multiple steps. From the infrastructure perspective, Learning Management System has been established to promote both synchronous and asynchronous forms of learning, especially in the challenging times of Coronavirus Disease - 2019 pandemic. At the same time, the Medical Education Unit of the college has been really active and has organized a series of faculty development programs to improve the capacity building of the faculty members of all phases of the under-graduation course.


  Conclusion Top


In conclusion, the traditional curriculum in medical education has played a very crucial role in the making of a wide range of specialists and doctors for prolonged durations. Although, some important attributes of a medical professional were not given much attention, we have to accept the fact that it was very much required for the successful launch and implementation of Competency-Based Medical Education in the nation.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Medical Council of India. Competency Based Under Graduate Curriculum; 2018. Available from: https://old.mciindia.org/InformationDesk/ForColleges/UGCurriculum.aspx [Last accessed on 2019 Apr 19].  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Powell DE, Carraccio C. Toward competency-based medical education. N Engl J Med 2018;378:3-5.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Kommalage M, Imbulgoda N. Introduction of student-led physiology tutorial classes to a traditional curriculum. Adv Physiol Educ. 2010;34:65-9.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Pandit S, Thomas MR, Banerjee A, Angadi M, Kumar S, Tandon A, et al. A crossover comparative study to assess efficacy of competency based medical education (CBME) and the traditional structured (TS) method in selected competencies of living anatomy of first year MBBS curriculum: A pilot study. Med J Armed Forces India 2019;75:259-65.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Whether introduction of competency based medical education should be advocated in India? Ind J Pharmac 2019;51:212-3.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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